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Woodworker's JournalWoodworker's Journal

Woodworker's Journal Sep/Oct 2016

Woodworker’s Journal is the magazine for people who love to work with wood. Woodworkers of any skill level will find top-tier plans to build great projects, expert reviews of woodworking tools, and a ton of woodworking tips and techniques. Get Woodworker's Journal digital magazine subscription today and get inspired and motivated.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Rockler Press, Inc
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SUBSCRIBE
$11.95
6 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time1 min.
woodworkersjournal.com

It's show time! Well, it was show time. We just returned from the International Woodworking Fair in Atlanta. This every-other-year event brings together the major players in woodworking supplies and tools. We did our best to bring you the newest and coolest stuff we found. Maybe you were among the thousands who followed our coverage. In case you missed it, you can still go back and watch all of the videos on our IWF blog at www.woodworkersjournal.com/IWF2016 or on our YouTube channel.Speaking of YouTube, if you haven't been there yet, be sure to check out our chan- nel (and subscribe, it's free!). You'll find over 600 videos and, by subscribing, you'll make sure you never miss a new release. All you have to do is go to www.youtube.com/WoodworkersJournal and hit…

access_time8 min.
you are the best!

OUR SURVEY OPENED MY EYES ...I eagerly anticipated the results of our survey asking "What type of woodworking do you do?" Every time I get a chance to find out more about what woodworkers are doing, it really lifts my sprirts. The diversity of projects (everything from small turnings to 12-string acoustic guitars to intarsia reproductions of classic art) gives me new challenges and fun ideas to follow. And even though we did not specifically ask why you all were building these things, the message came through loud and clear. We asked about projects you were proud of and got answers like: my granddaughter's crib, a kitchen table for my daughter, the bunk beds for my children, my sister's kitchen cabinets ... and the number of projects built for spouses…

access_time3 min.
tricks for better routing, crosscutting

Sponsored ByPullout Shelf Stages Parts at the Miter Saw StationRecently I built a new miter saw station, and I wanted a way to stage parts during the cutting process so they'd be close at hand but not in the way. So, I added this pullout shelf under one of the side support tables. It's hung on full-extension drawer slides. This way, I can pull it out when needed to hold workpieces. Once I'm done cutting them, I clear the shelf and push it closed until next time. The front of the shelf looks just like a drawer.Jerry ReedLake Ariel, PennsylvaniaCutting Board Routing SledIt can be hard to safely control narrow workpieces, like drawer sides or faces, when you have to rout dadoes or dove- tailed slots across the grain. But…

access_time5 min.
i bought a ros. how do i use it?

THIS ISSUE'S EXPERTSJoAnne Liebeler is a nationally known home improvement expert and television host.Tim Inman is owner of Historic Interiors (restoration and repro- duction) and author of The Art of Classical Furniture Finishing.Rob Johnstone is the publisher of Woodworker's Journal.Contact usby writing to "Q&A," Woodworker's Journal, 4365 Willow Drive, Medina, MN 55340, by faxing us at (763) 478-8396 or by emailing us at: QandA@woodworkersjournal.comPlease include your home address, phone number and email address (if you have one) with your question. Winner!For simply sending in his question about proper spacing of dog holes, Bill Rector of Canton, Michigan, wins a General International 7-piece Deluxe 8" DadoBlade Set (item 55-185).Each issue we toss new questions into a hat and draw a winner.The secret to using a ROS machine correctly is to SLOW…

access_time2 min.
rim shot

What's This?Travis Glessner of Berlin, Pennsylvania, found this tool in a drawer at his parents' house. They don't know what it is. Do you? Send your answer to stumpers@woodworkersjournal.com or write to "Stumpers," Woodworker's Journal, 4365 Willow Drive, Medina, MN 55340 for a chance to win a prize!Woodworker's Journal editor Joanna Werch Takes compiles each issue's Stumpers responses – and reads every one.Darrel Mathieu says that, now that tire rims are no longer made of steel, his mystery tool is obsolete.A couple of issues ago, we presented a mystery tool belonging to Darrel Mathieu of Luck, Wiscon- sin, who said he learned what it was "many years ago." According to Darrel, "It could still be used today for its intended purpose."It does, however, look very similar to a…

access_time6 min.
shakespeare's school

In the Guildhall (above), Shakespeare likely studied at a bench like those in the back of the room. (photos by Danny Keaney)An engraving of a rural class- room from Shakespeares era shows undisciplined boys, and no desks.Schoolboy Bard's "Desks" RecreatedApril 2016 marked the 400th anniversary of the death of William Shakespeare. As part of the commemorations, Tim Ross Bain recreated 18 oak bench- es and 12 oak rapier chests that would have been familiar to 16th century boys when The Bard was a pupil at what is now King Edward VI School in Strat- ford-upon-Avon.Open to the public for the first time this year is the room in this building, the old Guildhall, where young Shakespeare is thought to have studied. Part of the experience is the opportunity to…

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