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All About History Book of The Battle Of BritainAll About History Book of The Battle Of Britain

All About History Book of The Battle Of Britain

All About History Book Of The Battle Of Britain 2nd Edition

Few campaigns within either of the world wars are as well-known and remembered as the Battle of Britain. In this new edition, you’ll find incredible images of the battle’s people and planes, its devastating effects, and in-depth information about key moments. You’ll also find fascinating insights into how people experienced the war, with facsimiles of documents including letters sent home to loved ones, instructional pamphlets used by pilots, and morale reports. Discover the battle through the eyes of those who saw it, and honour the sacrifices made three-quarters of a century ago. Featuring: Forgotten heroes - Meet 10 of the heroes that made the Battle of Britain happen. Spitfire SM520 - Take a look inside the aircraft that helped train the pilots of the future. The battle in depth - From the battle's beginnings to the legacy it left behind. Amazing documents - From pilot's log books and morale reports to hand-written letters. Forgotten heroes - Meet 10 of the heroes that made the Battle of Britain happen Spitfire SM520 - Take a look inside the aircraft that helped train the pilots of the future The battle in depth - From the battle's beginnings to the legacy it left behind Amazing documents - From pilot's log books and morale reports to hand-written letters

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Future Publishing Ltd
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BUY ISSUE
R126,63

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time1 min.
welcome to all about history book of the battle of britain

The Second World War will always hold a legendary place in Britain’s history, and indeed the history of the world. Few campaigns within either of the world wars are as well-known and remembered as the Battle of Britain. Immortalised in Churchill’s speech before the battle even began, it was foremost a conflict in the sky, but its effects were also felt keenly on the ground. In this special 75th anniversary edition, you’ll find incredible images of the battle’s people and planes, its devastating effects, and in-depth information about key moments and strategies. You’ll also find fascinating insights into how people experienced the war, with facsimiles of documents including letters sent home to loved ones, instructional pamphlets used by pilots, and morale reports. Discover the battle through the eyes of those…

access_time16 min.
forgotten heroes

On 18 June 1940, Winston Churchill stood up in Parliament. The mood was gloomy. France had just surrendered, most of Europe was now under Nazi control and Britain faced Germany alone. “The Battle of France is over,” he announced. “The Battle of Britain is about to begin. Hitler knows he must break us in these islands or lose the war. If we can stand up to him, all Europe may be freed. But if we fail, then the whole world will sink into the abyss of a new dark age.” Churchill had been warning of war for years but few had listened. The Nazis had spent much of the 1930s building the modern war machine that had just ravaged most of Europe. By contrast, British rearmament had only begun in earnest…

access_time2 min.
a day in the life of a battle of britain pilot

WOKEN AT DAWN All fighter pilots’ days started at dawn with a cup of tea brought to them by a junior rank. They wash and dress before being driven in lorries to the dispersal area. Here, by the runway, they eat breakfast – if they have the time – and wait. “SCRAMBLE!” By mid-morning, the radar stations start picking up incoming enemy aircraft. The dispersal area phone rings. The duty officer answers, nods his head, then clicks on the tannoy and shouts “Scramble!” into the receiver and across the airfield. INTO THE AIR Having raced to their planes, clambered into their parachutes and climbed into their aircraft, which fitters will already have started for them, pilots begin to taxi down the runway and take to the air. MISSION BRIEFING With the planes now airborne, through their headphones…

access_time1 min.
germany's fighter aces

OBERLEUTNANT HELMUT WICK BATTLE OF BRITAIN KILLS: 42 Wick was the highest-scoring pilot of the battle. The 25-year-old became only the fourth member of the German armed forces to be awarded the King’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaf Clusters. He was killed in combat in November 1940. MAJOR ADOLF GALLAND BATTLE OF BRITAIN KILLS: 35 Galland would go on to become the youngest general in the German military, attaining the rank of general of the fighter arm in 1941. His total number of kills for the war was 104, despite being banned from combat between December 1941 and the end of 1944 by Hitler himself. HAUPTMAN WALTER OESAU BATTLE OF BRITAIN KILLS: 34 By the time the Battle of Britain started, Oesau was already a veteran of the Spanish Civil War, the invasion of Poland…

access_time7 min.
spitfire sm520 1948-1951

The Spitfire is almost ubiquitous when discussing Britain’s war in the skies during War World II. There were 22 different versions of the classic interceptor fighter built during the height of its time in the RAF. One of these was the SM520, a two-seater plane based on the TR9 model, which itself came from a Spitfire Mk IX. The conversion from one to two seats was a post-war program, with the first SM520 arriving in 1948. The project helped provide flight and gunnery practise for new recruits to the RAF, such as the Irish Air Corps (IAC) Seafire fleet and many other air forces in what was to become the Commonwealth of Nations. This particular model was constructed as a oneseater TR9 in a West Bromwich factory and was first delivered to…

access_time2 min.
battle in the skies

No other battle in recent British history has been accorded the same status as the Battle of Britain, fought out over the skies of England in the summer and autumn of 1940 between the Royal Air Force and the German air force. The Battle followed on from the defeat of France in June 1940 and the expulsion of British forces from Continental Europe during the Dunkirk evacuation. The general expectation in Britain was of a German invasion at some point later in 1940. One way of ensuring that invasion might be postponed was to deny the German forces air superiority over southern England. The onus of achieving this fell on RAF Fighter Command. The failure of the German air force to eliminate British fighter defences played a critical part in…

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