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All About SpaceAll About Space

All About Space No. 92

Every issue All About Space delivers fascinating articles and features on all aspects of space and space travel with mind-blowing photography and full-colour illustrations that bring the amazing universe around us to life.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Future Publishing Ltd
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13 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

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welcome

We're just one issue away from one of the greatest moments in the history of spaceflight, when it'll be 50 years since humanity first touched down on the surface of the Moon with Apollo 11. We geared up to it last issue, offering you a free eBook on the History of NASA, and this month is of no exception; we hope you enjoy your mini-magazine of some of the rarest images in the Apollo Moon landing photo archives. This issue, our topics of interest begin at the heart of our true understanding of the universe: the theory of everything. As it sounds, it encompasses every law that governs the cosmos – from quantum gravity and the curvature of space to electricity and magnetism. However, as you'll find this month, not everyone…

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our contributors include…

Kelly Oakes Space science writer Is there really a theory of everything? Kelly speaks to the cosmologists who are for it, while others are against a unified theory of the cosmos. Details on page 16. Stuart Atkinson Astronomer Take Stuart's tours of the summer night sky this month – there are plenty of clusters, galaxies and nebulae on display in the constellations of Scorpius and Sagittarius. Ryan Weed Physicist & pilot The antimatter physicist joins Brian Cox, Sara Seager and more to answer your pressing questions about the universe, planets, rockets and more . Lee Cavendish Staff Writer We're likely to have uncovered a brand-new exomoon for the very first time – but what do we really know about it? Head over to page 42 for Lee's full report.…

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sending off the supplies

Another day, another successful resupply mission to the International Space Station (ISS), courtesy of SpaceX and its Falcon 9 rocket. This image is a time-lapse taken from the CRS-17 (Commercial Resupply Services) mission on 4 May 2019. In this image you can distinguish between the initial launch of the Falcon 9 rocket with its central arc and the point where the payload and rocket detach at the tip. Afterwards the Falcon 9 began its descent to the right-hand side and started the re-entry burn before safely touching down on the Of Course I Still Love You autonomous spaceport drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean.…

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a galaxy of ice and fire

Spiral galaxy Messier 100 was recently imaged by the Atacama Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in Chile, revealing a host of blue and red spots – young and old stars. As some stars burn bright in their early age, the others tend to be a bit more frozen in their evolution. The diversity between the young stars bursting with brightness and the older stars gradually fading with age can tell a lot about the galaxy they live in. For instance, it can explain a lot about its size, age and internal dynamics. Unfortunately the data just isn’t high-resolution enough to delve any deeper into the mechanics of it.…

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astronauts are buzzing about a fleet of space bees

The ISS has been joined by a new host of robotic companions, with Bumble being shown in the image. NASA’s new breed of free-flying robotic systems, known as Astrobee, can help astronauts with caretaking responsibilities, therefore improving astronaut productivity. The long-term goal is to help with NASA’s eventual return to the Moon. NASA astronaut Anne McClain is pictured here performing hardware checks on Bumble in the Kibo module. Bumble was delivered with its fellow robotic companion, Honey, as part of Northrop Grumman’s 11th commercial resupply mission in April 2019.…

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spacex’s 60-satellite launch marks beginning for starlink ‘internet’ project

On 23 May, SpaceX lofted the first five-dozen members of its Starlink broadband constellation to low-Earth orbit (LEO) using one of the company's Falcon 9 rockets. Starlink is designed to provide internet connectivity to people around the world, and it will do so using a truly enormous number of satellites. Starlink won't be able to provide ‘minor’ coverage until about 400 spacecraft are up and running, and ‘moderate’ coverage requires about 800 operational satellites, SpaceX founder and CEO Elon Musk has said. But it doesn't plan to stop at ’moderate’. "In a year and a half, maybe two years if things go well, SpaceX will probably have more satellites in orbit than all other satellites combined – a majority of the satellites in orbit will be SpaceX," Musk said last week during…

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