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category_outlined / Cars & Motorcycles
Classic Motorcycle MechanicsClassic Motorcycle Mechanics

Classic Motorcycle Mechanics October 2018

Dedicated to the later classics and Japanese machines, Classic Motorcycle Mechanics has it all. Now 116 pages of road tests, rebuild guides, 'Street Specials' reviews and much much more... Staff Bikes - Classic Motorcycle Mechanics is the only magazine that "Buys its own bikes, rebuilds 'em and rides 'em".

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Mortons Media Group, Ltd
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BUY ISSUE
R43,54
SUBSCRIBE
R478,72
12 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time3 min.
all hail the honda cb750…

A better motorcycle journalist than I (aren’t they all?) once told me that he thought that the Honda CB750 was the most important two-wheeler of the 20th Century.He figured that Honda’s move to large capacity, multi-cylinder motorcycles at the end of 1968 was a seismic change that led to the domination of Japanese motorcycle manufacturers and that it was the CB750 – not the humble, multi-million selling Honda C90 – that showed the way to the future. The same journalist says that we should look again to the Far East – albeit China and Korea this time – for the next revolution. With these manufacturers either producing singles, twins or old-spec four-cylinder motors, will we see them move into other, larger capacity formats? And if so, what machines will…

access_time1 min.
game changer…

This month marks the 50th anniversary of Honda’s seminal CB750. It was 50 years ago that the almost futuristic shape of the Honda CB750 Four was first revealed at the Tokyo Automobile Show in October 1968. Futuristic? Well, at a time when singles and twins were the norm and triples were something special, to see a four-cylinder machine was something very different indeed and yet here it was and it was coming to a Honda dealer near you in 1969. Here was a machine that was building on Honda’s reputation with smaller capacity machines, but with yet more sophistication, with overhead cams, electric start, a disc-brake and yet all with the promise of Honda’s reliability. It looked stunning, too. And it still does today, which…

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honda’s superb cb750

F1: not the earliest model... but better. So why not? For a model that celebrates its half century this year you’d be forgiven for thinking finding yourself an example of the world’s first true production superbike might be a thankless task – well I’m happy to report that there’s no shortage of seven fifty Hondas on the open market.This boils down to a couple of reasons why this is the case. Firstly, the single overhead cam CB750 kept its place in the Honda range for a decade and the DNA of the original CB750-K0 got various updates over its lifespan, which means there’s a CB750 to suit most pockets.The deepest pockets are required for those early K0 models, but it’s a case of buyer beware when hunting for…

access_time2 min.
cb750 top tips!

We spoke to Vin Egan from V Bikes who has bought, sold and stripped Honda 750s for parts over the years. Here’s some of his CB750 wisdom on parts and availability.■ Exhausts: NOS systems are extremely rare and pricey. There are some excellent pattern systems out there, mostly for the four-pipe models. They won’t carry vital hallmarks of genuine Honda systems, but they will look beautiful when fitted.■ Bodywork: There’s plenty still out there, tanks are hard to find in tip top condition. Being steel they do rot so avoid poor repairs, especially if you intend to invest money in a professional respray.■ Carbs: Easy to remove, strip and clean. Parts are readily available and with the right tools it’s a job that is easily achievable by anyone…

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the latest riding kit, top tools, tyres, retro clothing and more!

SUZUKI TEAM GEAR We love Suzuki’s casual gear. They do a wide array of stuff from the Team Classic clothing, to a cool corporate black and red range, to Stefan Everts’ off-road inspired gear, through to cool casual shirts, T-shirts, tops and jackets. www.suzuki-shop.co.uk/SUZUKI-CLOTHING FROM £89.99 DUCHINNI D388 LID Want an open lid with a dash of vintage style: then how about this? Its ABS shell meets the ECE 22.05 standards and it is fitted with an anti-scratch pull-down internal sun visor, goggle strap and removable/washable lining. We love the look of the ‘rust’ and ‘iron patina’ graphics! These sell for £89.99 or you can have the black leatherette-covered shell and luxury vintage-inspired textile lining (but no sun visor) for £99.99. All come in sizes XS-XL. www.thekeycollection.co.uk …

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book corner

£25 TT TITANS Matthew Richardson has given us 25 TT winning machines and their stories in this book. From 1907 through to 2014 there’s a huge story going on here with recollections, extracts of interviews, period images, anecdotes and facts... it’s all there. Lots of interesting details of the riders and their machines, set against the backgrounds of the time. Two-stroke and four-stroke are both covered and for once the sidecar boys get good coverage as well. If you like racing it’s going to be hard to put this one down! www.pen-and-sword.co.uk £35 SUZUKI MOTORCYCLES Brian Long gives us more two-stroke/ stinkwheels than you can shake a dipstick at with this book. From commuters’ machines to factory race bike and from tiddlers to tourers, it’s a damn good…

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