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category_outlined / Business & Finance
Farmer's WeeklyFarmer's Weekly

Farmer's Weekly

22 February 2019

Farmer’s Weekly is an agricultural magazine based in South Africa, targeting the whole of Southern Africa. The magazine is committed to advancing the interests of the region’s farmers and its agricultural industry by serving as a mouthpiece for the industry and by keeping its readers informed of the latest developments in the agricultural sector.

Country:
South Africa
Language:
English
Publisher:
Caxton Magazines
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50 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time2 min.
co-ops are making a comeback

The farming sector has a long tradition of depending on co-operative models that, in essence, offer groups of smaller or medium-sized farmers the same scale of benefits that would otherwise have been available to only large, corporate farming businesses. There are still a number of agricultural co-operatives operating in South Africa, and while most of these businesses have retained a strong focus on being, at least in part, farmer owned, they have grown into larger, more sophisticated business structures.There does, however, seem to be a new demand in the primary farming sector for smaller groups of farmers to cooperate in a new way. This new model, which includes farmers embracing the sharing economy (for example, an Uber-type model for farm equipment), is driven by the price pressure that producers…

access_time5 min.
commercial farmers’ vital role in rural development

“Various state departments seem wary of making use of commercial farmers’ skills. In doing so, they are robbing young emerging farmers of a good source of mentorship and finance. This will cause more dependency on the state when what is needed is for people to become entrepreneurs.The lack of skills transfer in South Africa’s land reform programme was exacerbated by the resignation of many mentors after the state stopped paying them for their services.A possible solution to all of these problems is what I call ‘equity share’. EQUITY PROMOTES PRODUCTIVITY Equity share is a partnership where profits from a business are shared among partners in proportion to the equity contribution of each. In the case of land reform, the value of the land is included in the landowner’s…

access_time2 min.
farmer’s diary

Advanced Grass Identification 5 TO 7 MARCH THIS WORKSHOP FOCUSES ON THE IMPORTANCE OF GRASS AND GRASS IDENTIFICATION, AND INCLUDES THEORY AND PRACTICAL DEMONSTRATIONS. IT ALSO TEACHES DELEGATES HOW TO CORRECTLY IDENTIFY AND COLLECT VARIOUS GRASS SPECIES. CONFERENCES, WORKSHOPS & EXPOS 25 TO 26 FEBRUARY Artificial Insemination for Pig Producers, Middelburg.Email gtc@picrsa.co.za , or phone 082 885 9741. 27 TO 28 FEBRUARY Efficient Beef Cattle Production, Kuruman.Visit bommereaipela.co.za , or email info@bommereaipela.co.za . 5 TO 7 MARCH Advanced Grass Identification, ALUT Training Farm, Modimolle.Email courses@alut.co.za . 6 TO 7 MARCH Undercover Farming Expo, CSIR International Convention Centre, Pretoria. Visit …

access_time1 min.
driving farming initiatives in africa

I am writing from cold Oslo in Norway to tell you how much help Farmer’s Weekly is to the work I do in Africa.I come from Kimberley in South Africa, and own a private organisation, called Afro Fadderforening, that my family in Oslo and I have been running for the past 20 years. Our organisation pays for the schooling of the poorest children in Ethiopia, Uganda and Zimbabwe. We will also soon be starting up in Malawi.We have had some great results, with 11 children graduating with university degrees in Ethiopia. We also run various small farming projects to support these children’s parents.Over the past six years, I have begun investing in farming in these countries. I invest my own funds in building up these farms, but I don’t…

access_time2 min.
what plans are there for agriculture?

Much was said by South African President Cyril Ramaphosa during the recent state of the nation address (SONA).However, in terms of agriculture, Ramaphosa didn’t say anything that he hasn’t said before, or that hasn’t been said by his predecessors.Over the past year under Ramaphosa’s administration, more than 30 000 jobs have been lost in agriculture.The drought has led to an outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), which would not have happened if government had been proactive in ensuring drought relief. Farmers United South Africa (FUSA) had written to the Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (DAFF) to request aid for our farmers in Limpopo, but nothing, other than the outbreak, came of this. Millions of rand meant for drought relief have been squandered or are missing, yet government has taken…

access_time4 min.
new guinea – garden of eden

Highland woman with tree kangaroo destined to become a meal and an ornament. A head-dress of bird of paradise feathers. 43 YEARS AGO The ceremonial use of animal skins and bird feathers in Papua New Guinea threatened the indigenous wildlife, according to this article by Vincent Wager. In the New Guinea highlands, wild animals are slaughtered for food and adornment. All the natives are decorated in extraordinary fashion: painted faces, feathers and quills through holes pierced in the nose and ears, necklaces of animal teeth, pigs’ tusks, hornbill heads, head-dresses of opossum fur, cassowary, lorikeet, parrot, bird of paradise feathers, bands of monitor or snake skin, a cravat and dangling tail of a tree kangaroo, a dagger of cassowary beak or carved leg bone. All the tribes…

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