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Fine Cooking

Fine Cooking

April/May 2021 No.169
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Fine Cooking offers knowledge and inspiration for passionate cooks. The November/December 2020 issue contains recipes featuring seasonal ingredients such as pomegranates, root vegetables, and cool-weather greens, plus easy weeknight dishes for a busy holiday season. Other special sections include three perfect turkeys for Thanksgiving—from a classic brined bird to an asado-style spatchcocked turkey, to soy-miso-glazed breasts—a classic Christmas menu, and a selection of beautiful maple desserts. Every issue of Fine Cooking includes numerous unique and delicious recipes as well as helpful tips and guidelines to ensure that each recipe you try at home turns out as beautiful and tasty as it appears in the magazine photos.

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Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Meredith Corporation
Frequency:
Bimonthly
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6 Issues

in this issue

2 min.
sign of the times

Broad-leaved ramps. Alabaster asparagus spears. Spongy, cone-shaped morels. Is it any coincidence that some of the most prized produce gems make their appearance in the spring? Perhaps they are a little gift from nature, a thank you for enduring the dark, seemingly endless days of winter. In this issue, we’re celebrating all of those culinary cues that remind us of the hope and optimism that this season often brings. For example, Chef Bryant Terry invites you to come out of hibernation—in more ways than one—with a lesson in foraging. Inspired by a Saturday stroll in his Bay Area neighborhood, he shares a plant-based menu (p. 60), featuring ingredients found growing near his home, like wild spring onions, chamomile, and lemon balm. Other dishes feature more familiar ingredients prepared in clever new ways.…

1 min.
masthead

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Maggie Glisan DESIGN DIRECTOR Tempy Segrest PHOTOGRAPHY DIRECTOR Paden Reich ART DIRECTOR Emily Johnson OPERATIONS EDITOR Diane Rose Keener CONTRIBUTING DRINKS EDITOR Jill Silverman Hough CONTRIBUTING COPY EDITOR Michael Olivo CONTRIBUTING PROOFREADER Andrea Cooley CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER Ken Carlson, Waterbury Publications, Inc. CONTRIBUTING FOOD STYLIST Jennifer Peterson SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT & GROUP PUBLISHER Mark Josephson mark.josephson@meredith.com MEREDITH PREMIUM PUBLISHING EDITORIAL ADMINISTRATION EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Jill Waage EXECUTIVE CREATIVE DIRECTOR Michael D. Belknap ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITOR Jennifer Speer Ramundt BUSINESS MANAGER, EDITORIAL Cindy Slobaszewski LEAD BUSINESS OFFICE ASSISTANT Gabrielle Renslow DIRECTOR, MEREDITH FOOD STUDIOS Allison Long Lowery DIRECTOR, MEREDITH TEST KITCHEN Lynn Blanchard MEREDITH PREMIUM PUBLISHING VICE PRESIDENT & GROUP PUBLISHER Scott Mortimer VICE PRESIDENT, MARKETING Jeremy Biloon DIRECTOR, BRAND MARKETING Jean Kennedy BRAND MANAGER Kate Roncinske ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR, BRAND MARKETING Bryan Christian SENIOR BRAND MANAGER Katherine Barnet ASSOCIATE BRAND MANAGER Samantha Lebofsky CONSUMER MARKETING MANAGER Laura Krogh ASSOCIATE BUSINESS DIRECTOR Jenna Bates BUSINESS MANAGER Lisa Carlson DIRECTOR, PREMEDIA SERVICES Amy…

4 min.
in season

White Asparagus Its appearance is so brief that if you blink, you might miss it. But it’s worth seeking out this vegetable delicacy during its short window of availability. Popular in Europe—especially Germany—the white variety has a subtle sweetness and a more tender texture and milder flavor than green. But the white variety isn’t genetically different from its green counterpart. Rather, the spears’ pale color is due to the fact that they are grown under mulch or thick tarps that prevent sunlight from reaching them, so they don’t form the chlorophyll that makes the plants green. And because they are more labor-intensive to grow, they tend to be significantly more expensive than green asparagus. shop » You can find white asparagus at farmers markets and well-stocked grocery stores from April to June. Look…

3 min.
the reading list

Eat, Habibi, Eat! Fresh Recipes for Modern Egyptian Cooking by Shahir Massoud (Random House; $35.00) Flip through Shahir Massoud’s debut cookbook, and you’ll quickly discover that his approach to Egyptian cooking is a unique one. The Canadian chef and television host born to Egyptian parents was trained in French cuisine in New York and spent much of his career cooking Italian food, and there’s a decidely modern feeling of experimentation and playfulness that percolates throughout the pages. Egyptian and French influences collide in a stuffed eggah with feta, a mash-up of the Egyptian frittata with the classic French rolled-style omelet. Pitas stuffed with fried shrimp, popular from Cairo to the Suez Canal, lean in the Canadian direction when served in a top-cut bun with a finishing sprinkle of Old Bay. And sure, there are also…

2 min.
salad days

Pantry Star A special vinegar—like a single-ingredient small batch vinegar made in the heart of Beaujoulaise— can transform the simplest of fresh greens into something remarkable. The honey variety (vinaigre de miel) makes a lovely substitute for sherry vinegar and works well in unison with fresh asparagus or roasted carrots and beets. From $15.00; laboiteny.com On Display The most beautiful salads deserve a serving bowl to match. Anolon’s tapered teak wood bowl has plenty of room for tossing and showing off everything from a kale Caesar brimming with homemade croutons to an herb-packed tabbouleh. And when not in use for your best panzanella, you can pile in fresh fruit for display on your kitchen table. Anolon Pantryware 3-Piece Teak Wood Salad Serving Set $89.99; anolon.com A Cut Above Shaving and spiralizing vegetables is a genius…

3 min.
repertoire

Short Order Shortcakes are more biscuit than cake, and bear little resemblance to the packaged sponge cakes masquerading as shortcakes in the supermarket aisle. True shortcakes are tender and flaky, and—much like biscuits—the key to baking them is in the details. First is how you handle the fat and flour. Freezing the butter and shortening before handling it ensures a crumbly cake. (If the butter comes to room temperature, your dough will be flat and textureless.) And when you rub the butter and shortening into the dry ingredients with your fingers, you want to maintain pea-size chunks of fat. As the cakes bake, those chunks will melt, creating little air pockets that contribute to a light, fluffy texture. The second important factor is how you handle the dough. Put simply: Less is more.…