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Fine Cooking

Fine Cooking February/March 2021 No.168

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Fine Cooking offers knowledge and inspiration for passionate cooks. The November/December 2020 issue contains recipes featuring seasonal ingredients such as pomegranates, root vegetables, and cool-weather greens, plus easy weeknight dishes for a busy holiday season. Other special sections include three perfect turkeys for Thanksgiving—from a classic brined bird to an asado-style spatchcocked turkey, to soy-miso-glazed breasts—a classic Christmas menu, and a selection of beautiful maple desserts. Every issue of Fine Cooking includes numerous unique and delicious recipes as well as helpful tips and guidelines to ensure that each recipe you try at home turns out as beautiful and tasty as it appears in the magazine photos.

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Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Meredith Corporation
Frequency:
Bimonthly
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6 Issues

in this issue

2 min.
why cooking is still important

The past twelve months have been challenging at best. We’ll spare you the clichés (“unprecedented” and “uncertain” times are phrases that may see themselves out in 2021), but as we approach the one-year mark of the pandemic, there’s something we know for sure: Cooking still matters. For much of 2020, we relied on standbys to feed, fuel, and comfort ourselves and others: Big batches of Bolognese were delegated to freezer bags so we always had something homemade on hand; chicken noodle soup was divied into quart containers to be left on a friend’s front porch on a dime; decorated brown sugar shortbread cookies were popped in the mail to celebrate the special moments, even if we couldn’t celebrate in person; and of course there was banana bread—loaves and loaves of banana…

1 min.
masthead

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Maggie Glisan DESIGN DIRECTOR Tempy Segrest PHOTOGRAPHY DIRECTOR Paden Reich ART DIRECTOR Emily Johnson OPERATIONS EDITOR Diane Rose Keener CONTRIBUTING DRINKS EDITOR Jill Silverman Hough CONTRIBUTING COPY EDITOR Michael Olivo CONTRIBUTING PROOFREADER Carrie Truesdell CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER Ken Carlson, Waterbury Publications, Inc. CONTRIBUTING FOOD STYLIST Jennifer Peterson ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Courtney Bush SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT & GROUP PUBLISHER Mark Josephson mark.josephson@meredith.com MEREDITH PREMIUM PUBLISHING EDITORIAL ADMINISTRATION EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Jill Waage EXECUTIVE CREATIVE DIRECTOR Michael D. Belknap ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITOR Jennifer Speer Ramundt BUSINESS MANAGER, EDITORIAL Cindy Slobaszewski LEAD BUSINESS OFFICE ASSISTANT Gabrielle Renslow DIRECTOR, MEREDITH FOOD STUDIOS Allison Long Lowery DIRECTOR, MEREDITH TEST KITCHEN Lynn Blanchard MEREDITH PREMIUM PUBLISHING VICE PRESIDENT & GROUP PUBLISHER Scott Mortimer VICE PRESIDENT, MARKETING Jeremy Biloon DIRECTOR, BRAND MARKETING Jean Kennedy BRAND MANAGER Kate Roncinske ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR, BRAND MARKETING Bryan Christian SENIOR BRAND MANAGER Katherine Barnet ASSOCIATE BRAND MANAGER Samantha Lebofsky CONSUMER MARKETING MANAGER Laura Krogh ASSOCIATE BUSINESS DIRECTOR Jenna Bates BUSINESS MANAGER Lisa Carlson DIRECTOR, PREMEDIA SERVICES Amy Tincher-Durik DIRECTOR, QUALITY Joseph Kohler PREMEDIA TRAFFICKING SUPERVISOR Sarah Schuster COLOR QUALITY ANALYST Jill M. Hundahl MEREDITH NATIONAL MEDIA GROUP PRESIDENT Catherine Levene PRESIDENT, MEREDITH MAGAZINES Doug Olson PRESIDENT, CONSUMER PRODUCTS Tom Witschi PRESIDENT, MEREDITH DIGITAL Alysia Borsa EXECUTIVE…

4 min.
in season

Beets While you can find them in the produce aisle year-round, the season for this root peaks from November through the late winter months. The reddish-purple beets are the most common, but you can also find white, golden, and pink-and-white striped (Chioggia or “candy cane”) varieties. Regardless of color, all are similar in flavor, with their characteristic sweetness due to a high sugar content. Beets have two distinct parts—the root and the leafy green top—and the latter is actually a close relative to chard that can be prepared similarly. But whichever you eat, both have impressive nutritional power, with the roots boasting high levels of folate and manganese, and the greens containing high amounts of vitamin C. shop » Look for beets that have smooth skins and feel firm to the touch, and…

3 min.
the reading list

Jew-ish Reinvented Recipes from a Modern Mensch by Jake Cohen (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; $30.00) What happens when food writer and “nice Jewish boy” Jake Cohen puts his millenial lens on Grandma’s traditional Jewish dishes? Fun, modern deliciousness. That’s what happens. Drawing from his Ashkenazi upbringing and taking inspiration from his husband’s Persian-Iraqi background, Cohen reimagines the dishes he grew up with to create fresh, enticing recipes for a new generation of home cooks: Bagels and lox is transformed into an everything bagel galette for brunch with friends (you know how millenials love to brunch), saffron gives latkes a Persian spin, and kugel meets spinach-artichoke dip in a decidedly savory twist. There’s a little something for everyone, and you don’t need to be a pro at baking babka or an expert on brisket—or Jewish for…

1 min.
brunch time

Better Brew There’s a greater purpose to sipping a cup of BLK & Bold than simply getting your caffeine fix. Founders of the first nationally distributed Black-owned coffee company Pernell Cezar and Rod Johnson are on a mission to fight for social justice and better communities—one cup at a time. The brand’s premium coffees and teas aren’t just delicious. Five percent of profits go to support youth programming and combat homelessness. $14; blkandbold.com One-Pan Breakfast Making brunch for the family is an enjoyable endeavor, but cleaning the stacks of pans afterwards? Not so much. That’s one of many reasons we love the the Lodge Legacy Series Bacon & Egg Griddle. The preseasoned cast iron pan has cleaver dividers so you can easily make your eggs and bacon in the same skillet. $49.95; lodgecastiron.com Syrup…

11 min.
make it tonight

WEEKNIGHT MEALS chicken tagine with apricots and olives You can find ras el hanout, an aromatic Moroccan spice blend, in well-stocked grocery stores, or you can make your own. Simply substitute ½ tsp. each ground cumin and ginger, and ¼ tsp. each ground cinnamon, coriander, and allspice. Serves 4 2 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil1 lb. boneless, skinless chicken thighs, trimmed and cut into 1-inch piecesKosher salt1 large onion, chopped1 lemon, zested and juiced1 Tbs. minced garlic1 Tbs. grated fresh ginger1 Tbs. tomato paste2 tsp. ras el hanout2 cups unsalted chicken broth1 15-oz. can chickpeas, rinsed½ cup dried apricots½ cup pitted green olives, halved½ cup toasted slivered almondsFresh cilantro, for garnishCooked white rice, optional Heat 1 Tbs. oil in a large pot over medium-high heat. Add chicken, and season with salt. Cook, stirring occasionally, until…