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category_outlined / Travel & Outdoor
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go!

March 2019

South Africa’s number one travel and outdoor lifestyle magazine. We pay our own way and tell it like it is. We drive back roads and speak to real people, giving you practical information about affordable destinations in southern Africa. Each issue is crammed with excellent photography, honest gear reviews and delicious recipes to make at home or in the bundu. Whether you’re looking to escape for a weekend or a month, your journey starts here.

Country:
South Africa
Language:
English
Publisher:
Media 24 Ltd
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12 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time2 min.
a state of freedom

OUR PROMISE We don’t accept freebies. When one of our journalists visits a destination, it’s mostly unannounced and the magazine covers all costs. If we don’t pay for something, we’ll tell you about it. We strive to travel like our readers travel. If you think we’re not keeping our promise, write to editor@gomag.co.za I formed a relationship with the Free State on 25 September 1976, the day the burly legs of De Wet Ras kicked my dreams to smithereens on a rugby field in Bloemfontein. I was nine years old and I might have cried that day.Earlier that afternoon, the whole Steyn clan had gathered in front of a brand-new Telefunken. The miracle of television was only a year old. Before 1976, we listened to rugby on the…

access_time2 min.
behind the scenes

(LUCY DELL) What happened? There are an overwhelming number of places to stay around Bela-Bela, Modimolle, Mokopane, Vaalwater… Choosing which to visit was like trying to order a meal in a restaurant where the menu is as thick as a dictionary. I finally narrowed it down to five places and visited them all, but when I got back to Cape Town, there was a break-in at my flat and my laptop was stolen. I lost all my photos and the work I’d done. I learnt my lesson and now I back everything up on Google Drive. ( Thanks to Lawrette McFarlane who travelled to all the places on short notice to take new photos. – Ed. ) Best place you visited in the Bushveld?…

access_time1 min.
write to us & win!

Etienne wins a Zartek TX-8 two-way radio twin pack, worth R1 000. The TX-8 is the latest model from Zartek. It has a slim, lightweight design, the audio is loud and clear and the reception range is excellent. The set comes standard with a cradle, USB charging cable and a belt-clip case. zartek.co.za ■…

access_time1 min.
speak to us

Send your letters to editor@gomag.co.za  – please include your name, surname and where you live. Please also include a photo if you have one. We reserve the right to edit and shorten letters, and use your photos elsewhere in the magazine, on our digital platforms and in our marketing material. ■…

access_time7 min.
winning letter

Tortoise with a death wish? We visited the Karoo National Park last year. One afternoon, from a hide, we saw Bitterbal, the oldest lion in the park and father to the famous Sylvester. He was eating a leopard tortoise. About an hour and a half later, another leopard tortoise appeared and walked straight up to the lion. The tortoise rammed its head against the lion’s hindquarters a few times before the big cat noticed it. The lion kept eating its meal and the tortoise sat next to the lion for a while. The lion ate the last of the meat from the shell and got up to drink some water. Then he lay down on top of the second tortoise. A while later, the…

access_time3 min.
q & a

Two bugs? Or one? Q LOUISE MINNAAR from Nelspruit writes: I took this picture on a friend’s farm in the Klaserie area. Can you identify the insect under the leaf? A Entomologist DUNCAN MACFADYEN says: It’s the exoskeleton of a dragonfly nymph. The adult is on the reed above, after having emerged. Dragonflies lay their eggs in water, which hatch into these weird-looking nymphs. When the nymph is ready to emerge as an adult, it climbs out of the water up a reed or a branch. There is no pupal stage in the life cycle of a dragonfly. This particular dragonfly is a barbet percher, which enjoys swampy habitats and feeds on a variety of prey, including nuisance species like mosquitoes, midges and biting flies.…

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