EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
Art & Architecture
Grand Designs Australia

Grand Designs Australia

Issue #9.3

Following the success of the new Australian TV series inspired by the UK version, Grand Designs Australia welcomes you to a new era in home design magazines. Whether you’re building a new home, renovating or decorating, this publication features everything readers will need to know about creating their own grand designs. Industry experts offer advice on getting started, mortgages, environmentally sustainable design and project management, to name a few. Grand Designs showcases architects and designers, builders and homeowners working together on projects from concept to completion and features the latest colour forecasts as well as planning your interior, kitchens, bathrooms and window coverings. Purchase includes the Digital Edition and News Service. Please stay in touch via our Facebook Page.

Country:
Australia
Language:
English
Publisher:
Universal Wellbeing PTY Limited
Frequency:
Bimonthly
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6 Issues

in this issue

1 min.
from the editor

Spring, once again, has sprung, and it feels good to be looking forward to brighter days than 2020 has shown us so far. It feels good, too, to be able to congratulate 2020’s Tiler of the Year (p28) on a job fantastically well done, and to give credit long overdue to a group of tradies whose talents aren’t sung nearly loudly enough. Second (and third) waves of coronavirus aside, we’re emerging from the pandemic’s stronghold with plenty of new life lessons, but what about that previous catastrophe that seems almost forgotten — the deadly bushfire season? The threat of climate change certainly isn’t receding, and one thing we really need to take from the summer of 2019/2020 is the importance of bushfire-proof housing, which we tackle on p56. On a more cheerful…

2 min.
from peter maddison

recently I’ve found myself reflecting on the way housing has developed during the last 10 years. There’s been a recurrence of certain directions, which I shared with Richelle Hunt on ABC Radio recently. I hope the ruminations around house development might change your outlook on what a house means. Earth houses, underground houses, small bushfire container sourced and pre-built seem to be garnering much interest. These housing types, along with the “tiny house” movement, are being explored by many brave homeowners. The idea of sustainability has become more accepted as standard and not an optional extra plug-on. People are looking to produce buildings that are more efficient than the mandatory 6-Star rating ensconced in the National Construction Code. People want to make our society carbon-neutral and are prepared to spend upfront…

4 min.
we have a winner!

Homeowners all over Australia enjoy stunning bathrooms, kitchens, driveways and more thanks to the unique skills and dedication of tilers, so Grand Designs Australia, National Tiles and Mazda decided to get together and award these trade heroes the recognition they deserved — thus the Tiler of the Year Awards was born. After diligent judging from our very own editor Angela Young along with founder of Kate Walker Design, Kate Walker and National Tiles head of procurement Camron Whittaker, the 10 finalists were chosen and presented for public voting. The result? Huge congratulations to Tom Samuels (@TileSmart), from Cronulla, New South Wales, for his victorious Burraneer steam room tiling project, which earned him the inaugural National Tiles Tiler of the Year award as well as a brand-new Mazda BT-50 Dual Cab…

2 min.
get social

01/ Under restaurant, Norway Fancy a bite on the sea floor? Under restaurant and research centre is the first of its kind in Europe, half-sunken at the southernmost point of the rugged Norwegian coastline. The 34m monolith juts out of the water from its resting spot on the seabed 5m below. The rough, half-metre-thick concrete form doubles as a durable shell to withstand the pressure of rough waters and an artificial reef for limpets and kelp to inhabit. Peer into the water through the restaurant’s massive window, which casts an extraordinary blue-green glow around the room. The interior grows darker and more intense as you go deeper. Photography by Inger Marie Grini and Bo Bedre Norge. snohetta.com 02/ Australian Interior Design Awards 2020 This year the program celebrated design in its…

3 min.
architecture snapshot

01 PARCHMENT WORKS HOUSE When the owners of this property approached Will Gamble Architects, the disused cattle shed and former parchment factory ruins seemed only a hindrance. The architects, however, saw potential in the history and offered another solution to celebrate what was and what could be. Thus, the idea of “a building within a building” was born. In keeping with the rural UK setting and to complement these ruins, the house utilises a palette of “honest materials” mostly upcycled from the site — a cost-effective and sustainable solution. Existing steel beams in the cattle shed were exposed, stone walls were re-pointed and washed in lime for a mottled effect, and a concrete plinth shaped to create a monolithic “skirting” along the base. The result is a marriage of old and…

3 min.
join us on a journey …

For several years, international model Phoebe Ghorayeb and her husband, fashion photographer Georges Antoni, dreamed of moving to Sydney’s Northern Beaches into their perfect home — one that could accommodate Georges’ huge family (all 13 of them!) and Phoebe’s British family when they come to visit. Since having two young daughters — Valentina and Siddy, aged two and 11 months — the couple decided to dive in and purchased a four-bedroom 1960s-style property on one level (with granny flat) in Bilgola Plateau, backing onto the Angophora Reserve and with unobstructed views of Pittwater. Their renovation plans? Bold and exciting. “We want a house that’s welcoming, liveable, usable,” Phoebe explains, adding comfortable and creative to the list. Given both Phoebe and Georges’ professions revolve around the design industries, it’s not too surprising…