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History Of War Book Of The British Civil Wars

History Of War Book Of The British Civil Wars

History Of War Book Of The British Civil Wars

The mid-17th century was one of the most explosive periods in history across the British Isles. In England, a desperate king fought bitterly against his defiant Parliament; in Scotland religious turmoil sparked invasions from the north; and in Ireland, an oppressive regime led to an all-out Catholic rebellion. In this bookazine, we explore the how all these events, and more, combined to make up the British Civil Wars, from the political machinations of Parliament to the bloody battlefield clashes at Edgehill, Naseby and Marston Moor. We follow the meteoric rise of Oliver Cromwell and his New Model Army, as well as the tragic decline of Charles I – a king executed by his own subjects. We also investigate how the countries transformed in the period of Interregnum, for better and for worse, before taking a look at how the monarchy made a stunningly peaceful return during the Restoration. Whether you’re an enthusiastic novice or a seasoned history buff, there are a wealth of expert features, illustrated battle maps and superb imagery for you within these pages. Featuring: Kingdoms at war - Explore the turbulent political scenes in England, Scotland and Ireland that sowed the seeds of war. King vs. Parliament - Naseby, Marston Moor and the execution of Charles I – experience the brutality of the Civil Wars. Cromwell’s reign - Discover how some prospered and other suffered under the Lord Protector’s authoritarian rule. Road to Restoration - Follow the political machinations that brought down the Protectorate and restored the British monarchy.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Future Publishing Ltd
Frequency:
One-off
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BUY ISSUE
R 132,20

in this issue

1 min.
history war book of the british civil wars

The mid-17th century was one of the most explosive periods in history across the British Isles. In England, a desperate king fought bitterly against his defiant Parliament; in Scotland religious turmoil sparked invasions from the north; and in Ireland, an oppressive regime led to an all-out Catholic rebellion. In this bookazine, we explore the how all these events, and more, combined to make up the British Civil Wars, from the political machinations of Parliament to the bloody battlefield clashes at Edgehill, Naseby and Marston Moor. We follow the meteoric rise of Oliver Cromwell and his New Model Army, as well as the tragic decline of Charles I – a king executed by his own subjects. We also investigate how the countries transformed in the period of Interregnum, for better and…

13 min.
oliver cromwell: king killer

The king was furious. His anger was so great that it clouded his vision and drove his marching feet forwards through Parliament. The swords of his soldiers clanked noisily as they followed him, but as they approached the doors of the House of Commons, he ordered them to wait outside. He had business to attend to. The rows of men inside slowly rose as he entered, watching silently as the man who believed God himself had put him on the throne strode towards the speaker’s chair, sat down and lounged back, his arms upon the rests. A murmured ripple passed over the crowd – this was an unprecedented move, as the monarch’s place was in the House of Lords. No king before had ever dared to break such a basic rule…

3 min.
cromwell vs king

Oliver Cromwell Cromwell’s father was the youngest son of one of the wealthiest landowners in the country and so he inherited only a small amount of land. Cromwell languished in the bottom rung of the gentry, not rich enough to be classed elite, but with enough money to maintain his status. Cromwell was raised Protestant in his youth but his Puritan tendencies emerged after a period of depression in which he experienced a religious conversion. He believed in freedom of religion, with religious groups able to practise their beliefs as they saw fit – as long as they were Protestant Cromwell was at his strongest on the battlefield commanding an army of men. This was mainly down to his strict discipline and calm under pressure. Because he was able to keep his head,…

1 min.
religious differences

One of the major points of contention that catapulted the country into civil war was the subject of religion. During the Protestant Reformation, many faith groups split away from the Roman Catholic Church and the population of Britain was divided on the correct way to worship God. While Catholic ceremonies were concerned with grand traditions and their churches full of elaborate statues and artwork, the Protestant and Puritan churches preferred a far more simple affair. Charles’s marriage to a Catholic woman and his support of adding more Catholic-like ceremony and tradition to Protestant services, were not well received by the Puritans.…

1 min.
why did the roundheads win?

The Royalists’ lack of finance Although the Royalist forces initially benefited from an influx of money from the English aristocracy, of which around 75 per cent supported Charles, throughout the war they suffered from funding difficulties. The areas the Royalists controlled were the sparsely populated rural areas in the North, Wales, and the South West. By comparison Parliament had control over more wealthy populated areas and, most significantly, London. This allowed them to gather much needed funds more quickly than the taxation that Royalist forces had to rely on, which could take a long time to implement. New Model Army Created by Oliver Cromwell himself, the New Model Army was Britain’s first professional fighting force. Paid and equipped by Parliament, the officers were promoted based on merit rather than social standing and as…

1 min.
the final hours of a traitor

Warmly dressed Charles wakes and calls for two shirts, so his possible shaking from the cold won’t be seen by spectators. 8.00am Final walk The king is granted a final walk through St James Park. He walks slowly through the park with his pet dog. 10.00am Last meal As he has taken communion, the king refuses to eat a large meal. He has a glass of claret wine and a single piece of bread. 12.00pm Delay The original executor suddenly backs down. The replacement is paid £100 and given permission to wear a mask. 1.00pm A king on the scaffold Charles is led to a scaffold covered in black cloth. He turns to the crowd and gives his last speech. 1.50pm One stroke Charles lays his head on the block. When he gives the signal, the executioner brings down the axe…