Kruger Magazine Autumn 2020

Few parts of the world can match the Greater Kruger Lowveld for its wildlife, natural and cultural diversity or the unique customer experience it offers to each visitor to this iconic region. Our targeted content is produced by leading journalists, photographers, videographers and graphic designers. We also draw on resources of a domestic and international network of expert contributors. Seasonally themed quarterly issues offer exciting information and content. The KRUGER MAGAZINE’s impressively broad editorial mix will offer engaging reading and satisfy not only the avid wildlife lover, adventurer, passionate photographer and domestic and international tourist, but also conservationists, researchers, and armchair travellers, amongst others. The KRUGER MAGAZINE offers essential content for anyone with a passion for wildlife who wants to understand and experience Africa’s Greater Kruger – a celebration of Africa’s GREATER KRUGER!

Country:
South Africa
Language:
English
Publisher:
MLP Media Pty Ltd
Frequency:
Quarterly
R 59,99
R 249,99
4 Issues

in this issue

2 min
setting the scene

The Greater Kruger is almost as luscious as it was in 2013 – the last time good rain fell in this region of South Africa. How quickly one forgets how beautiful the Lowveld is after a normal rainfall season – and how dense the bush really is during late summer. It is not just our area that is beautiful; there are the most amazing people here too. The story of Lilly Otto and her brother, Troy, taking a devastating activity’s tools and turning it into something so positive and self-sustaining, will leave you in awe. Read all about the Down to the Wire project on page 48. Africa’s smallest carnivore, the dwarf mongoose, exhibits a range of intriguing habits. They also have a mutualistic relationship with hornbills! In some of the private…

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2 min
from the publisher’s pen

KRUGER MAGAZINE was launched in June 2017 on our private Facebook page. The first quarterly issue was published in September 2017 as both interactive print and interactive digital editions. The private Facebook group has been developed to fully integrate with this quarterly publication. The team strives to offer engaging content and satisfy not only the avid wildlife lover, adventurer, passionate photographer and domestic and international tourist, but also conservationists, researchers and armchair travellers. We are privileged to have secured the involvement of wildlife and conservation experts since the inception. Some of the expert writers have had the privilege of working in the Kruger National Park for many years, even decades. Our combined passion for wildlife and dedication to create a quality reader and member experience, culminated in the team being recognised for our media…

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3 min
2019 annual kudu awards

South African National Parks (SANParks) supported by Total South Africa and First National Bank (FNB) recognised deserving conservationists at last year’s Kudu Awards ceremony held at the Gallagher Convention Centre in Midrand on 29 November. The awards were made possible thanks to forward-thinking and progressive partners who together, recognised internal and external stakeholders that have demonstrated exceptional commitment to sustainability, improving livelihoods and achieving real change on the ground in our national parks. The Kudu Awards and the Chief Executive Awards recognise SANParks employees as well as multiple stakeholders and disciplines who play a pivotal role in strengthening conservation in South Africa. According to Fundisile Mketeni, SANParks CEO, “Awareness of conservation issues is of vital importance and if we want to better protect our national parks, either through anti-poaching efforts or finding…

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1 min
makuleke

The Makuleke community used to live where the Limpopo and Luvhuvu Rivers meet in South Africa with Zimbabwe and Mozambique. In 1969 they lost their land under apartheid legislation but regained it 29 years later. Instead of resettling, they turned this biodiversity hotspot into a contract park within the Kruger National Park and it is now managed jointly with SANParks. The Makuleke Contractual Park or Pafuri Triangle, constitutes the northernmost section of the Kruger National Park, and comprises approximately 240km2 of land. “Only when our natural and cultural resources are well kept, will we be able to transfer knowledge, skills and business opportunities to our children. This is why we can now turn our creative talents and rich cultural heritage into products that we proudly present at outlets in and around the national parks of…

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4 min
my first visit to kruger greater

The Christmas of 1976 saw my first visit to the Greater Kruger National Park. I had recently become a single mom of two young children, so together with my mom, luggage, groceries, presents, etc. we were ready for our first wonderfully exciting trip into the unknown in my little 1969 VW Beetle. Our excitement had reached its peak on arrival at the Paul Kruger Gate. What I was met with was way beyond any expectations I had of the whole Kruger experience. To me the most incredible feeling was that within 100 metres of entering through those gates, it was like leaving one world and entering another – a world of peace and tranquillity and the anticipation of what awaited us. Our first sighting was that of the ever-popular impala, which just…

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4 min
sizzling satara

With Satara Rest Camp’s red-roofed public buildings, thatched rondawels and neatly raked walkways, an ambience of colonial Africa is ever present. “Satara is known as the ‘Cat Camp’ as it is particularly noted for spotting its selection of the big cats – lion, leopard and cheetah.” In the late 1800s, before the Kruger National Park (KNP) was proclaimed a national park, the burgers of the newly proclaimed Transvaal Republic carved up the region for human settlement. One of the surveyors sent to divide the region was an unnamed Indian man who marked present-day Satara on his map with the Hindi word ‘satra’ meaning 17. Being the Kruger’s third biggest camp, Satara is a busy camp, can accommodate more than 200 self-catering guests in guesthouses and bungalows and has just over 100 sites available…

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