EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
searchclose
shopping_cart_outlined
exit_to_app
category_outlined / Men's Lifestyle
Living ReadyLiving Ready

Living Ready

Fall 2018

Living Ready is the magazine that takes a broad look at what it takes to live well, as the tagline says, "in good times and bad."

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
F+W Media, Inc. - Magazines
Read Morekeyboard_arrow_down
BUY ISSUE
R90,20

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time11 min.
deer hunting success on small properties

Like a ghost mysteriously appearing before me, the giant white-tailed buck magically emerged from the field of tall native grasses. I instantly recognized him as one I had set my sights on three years earlier. He was a promising 31/2-year-old at the time — in fact, he was the biggest free-ranging 31/2-year-old I had ever seen in more than four decades of serious whitetail hunting. I kept close tabs on the buck and in fact passed multiple close range shooting opportunities at him each year. The year before he was 5½ years old and sporting a rack that would score north of 180 inches, but I let him walk on five different occasions that season, getting each encounter on video. But now it was time. The buck was 6½ years old and…

access_time8 min.
precision crossbow shooting

Shooters tend to blame the bow, the scope, or both when having difficulty getting their crossbows dialed in. But today’s bows and optics are so well designed and constructed that nine times out of 10 a zeroing issue rests with the person pulling the trigger. With that in mind, here are some tips that will make zeroing-in your crossbow a lot less frustrating. 1. STOP EVERYTHING AND READ I’ll start off by suggesting that every crossbow should have a scope. It will simply make life at the range and in the field easier. But you do have choices — lots of them. Whatever make and model you chose, it is vital to understand how it works and to follow the manufacturer’s instructions during setup and sighting-in. The owner’s manual is your bible.…

access_time8 min.
bring enough gun!

“Although they rapidly gained popularity with predator hunters, ARs are also a great option for big game and continue to gain popularity with those hunters.” From a young age the word gun to me always described anything that used a BB, pellet, cartridge, shotgun shell or a muzzleloader ball. Like a lot of shooters and hunters, I was enthralled by all of them, from the BB gun all the way up. My father was a green beret when he was young and drummed into me that all guns were to be handled safely at all times. He made no distinction whether it was a BB gun or a .30-06 when it came to gun safety. So neither did I — a gun was a gun. All I knew was that I wanted…

access_time1 min.
a crash course in ar anatomy

If you’re unfamiliar with AR-platform rifles they can be intimidating at first. The fact is they are super easy to operate. It’s also a great gun to teach kids how firearms work or at least provide a general understanding, because you can easily remove individual parts such as the sear, hammer, firing pin, etc. Here is a crash course on what makes an AR-platform rifle tick. Basically, there are two main halves to the gun, the upper and the lower. The complete lower includes a stock that comes in different models (such as fixed position or adjustable). It also has the pistol grip, the buffer spring, buffer, trigger assembly (which is the trigger, hammer and other related parts that are commonly called the fire control group) as well as the housing…

access_time4 min.
safe at home

Eli Knippenberg, general manager of Bear Safes in Oklahoma City, says it’s important to pay close attention to metal thickness and fire retardant qualities when buying a safe. According to him, the invincibility of many gun safes is illusory, starting with the locking system. Most safes have a system of stainless steel bolts that extend from the interior of the door into recesses in the body when you turn the handle. In most safes, these pins are just a few inches long. They are connected to thin metal rods that make up the tracking system. When you turn the handle, the rods move to project and retract the pins. “People believe — because they’ve never seen the inside of a safe — that these pins are 18 to 20 inches long,…

access_time4 min.
exact same gun, different shots

Your buddy has been raving about his new rifle, and you’re ready to crack open your piggy bank to splurge on an upgrade of your own. You heed his advice, buy the same exact rifle as your buddy, and book a day together at the range. You’re shooting the same ammo, from the same bench setup, but you can’t get your rifle to punch a dime-sized group like his. To rule out the human variable, you ask your buddy to fire a group with your rifle. Status quo. “This rifle isn’t worth a damn,” you assert. “Must have gotten a lemon.” If only guns were that simple. PROVING A POINT It was a glorious spring day in Minnesota: Several inches of snow had already fallen with no end in sight, but in…

help