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MILIEUMILIEU

MILIEU Spring 2018

In MILIEU, every story captures the look and feel, the mood and character, the style of a place - its milieu. The milieu that defines a great house or garden, the unique character of a design professional, the message conveyed in a thoughtful essay about home life, the creative strategies for accomplishing the look you want for your home - these are the elements of our magazine.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Pierce Publishing
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4 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

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editor’s say

WE GO MANY PLACES in this Spring issue of MILIEU. A small town tucked into Italy’s Amalfi Coast, a family-friendly resort at the foothills of Tennessee’s Great Smoky Mountains, an artisan workshop in Portugal, and lovely homes in Normandy, the Bahamas, Santa Fe, Palm Springs, suburban D.C. So often, where you go in life is about where you’re from. I live in Houston, but I’m from a small town in West Texas called San Angelo. While I have not lived there for some time, it is my original home and always will be. Which got me to thinking about Texas and the special hold the state has on those who grew up here. Once Texas is in you, it’s always in you. For one of our features in this issue, we…

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featured designers

Susan Snyder Susan Snyder, head designer/founder of the Himalayan Cashmere Company in Nepal, is an American who trained at the Detroit Institute of Arts and The Cooper Union in New York City. She left America for Asia to start a unique hand-manufacturing artesano weaving workshop in Kathamndu, where she became a pioneer in the cashmere boom, working with Calvin Klein Home, Donna Karan, and Polo Ralph Lauren. David Flint Wood Twenty-five years ago, David Flint Wood threw in a perfectly decent career in advertising and ran away to run an eight-room hotel and a bar on Harbour Island in the Bahamas. Not long afterwards, India Hicks “wandered into his gin joint” and they began a family together. They restored an old house, then built cottages to handle the overflow of family and friends,…

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wall flowers

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home plates

1 It’s akin to staring into a clear blue sky when dining off the Tourron Bleu Chardon dinner plate, Jars Céramistes 2 A plate can appear as a lovely mélange of decorative forms, with the Ruban plate in Bleu Orage/Noir, Marie Daâge 3 The traditional printed batik takes on a new meaning in the Cote D’Azur Batik salad plate, Ralph Lauren Home 4 Twirl your pasta in style and with confidence when using a small blue spaghetti bowl, Wonki Ware Di Marshall Pottery 5 Now you can eat your main course on a work of art with the Anfora Puebla Blue dinner plate, Replacements, Ltd 6 The kind of delicate Chinoiserie scene you find on a toile appears on the Oriente Italiano Pervinca charger plate, Richard Ginori 7 One of the decorative motifs typical of Spain…

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blackberry   season

One of the most magical times of day at Blackberry Farm is early morning, when mist wafts gently over the foothills of Tennessee’s Great Smoky Mountains and hangs like a cloud over the property’s Tellico Lake. There are 4,200 acres here, an hour south of Knoxville in the eastern part of the state, and scattered among them is a topographical array of hills, forests, grassy fields, and streams. There are also blackberry bushes, which gave the property its name. Back in the 1930s, the previous owners, a couple named Florida and Dave Lasier, discovered this land while traveling between Chicago and the Georgia coast searching for a locale to build a home. They were enchanted by the place and when Florida’s stockings snagged on a blackberry bush, they had the name.…

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ciao cetara!

A writer can work anywhere. But the muse is especially accommodating in a tiny town called Cetara, cradled within hills on Italy’s Amalfi Coast. There, amid the dull clangs of fishing boats, hourly choruses of church bells, and the effusive greetings of townspeople as they course the cobblestone streets, the material for a story or a poem seems as available as the region’s sunshine. It is here, in an airy room filled with sea breezes atop the town’s 14th-century fortress torre, or tower, that students gather daily for the Sarah Lawrence College Writing Institute program, I among them. This is the ultimate example of a working vacation (this year, classes run May 25–June 1), though the labor involves penning stanzas and the opening paragraphs of memoirs and novels— which make for…

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