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Poets & Writers MagazinePoets & Writers Magazine

Poets & Writers Magazine November - December 2018

For more than twenty years, Poets & Writers Magazine has been a trusted companion to writers who take their vocation seriously. Within its pages, our readers find provocative essays on the literary life, practical guidance for getting published and pursuing writing careers, in-depth profiles of poets, fiction writers, and writers of creative nonfiction, and conversation among fellow professionals.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Poets & Writers, Inc
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6 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time1 min.
pw.org

Visit our Small Presses and Literary Magazines databases for detailed information, such as reading periods, editors’ advice, and submission guidelines, about more than fifteen hundred spots to send your work. Keep track of your submissions to magazines and small presses using our Submission Tracker. Never lose sight of how many times you’ve submitted your work, the amount of money you’ve spent on reading fees, how much time has passed since your last submission, and more. Read the expanded interviews with Emily Nemens, the new editor of the Paris Review, and Laurie Hertzel of the Star Tribune. Check out excerpts of the debut books by our 5 Over 50 authors. Get advice, anecdotes, insights, and new ways of thinking about writing and the business of books from Agents & Editors Recommend. Listen to the new episode…

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editor’s note

MY WIFE AND I RECENTLY HAD DINNER WITH A COUPLE IN our neighborhood whose kids are about the same age as ours and who share many of our interests. They also have a good sense of humor, part of the foundation of any good friendship, so our families get together not infrequently. But this particular occasion was notable for its—how shall I put it—lively after-dinner conversation. Whether it was due to our hectic work and school schedules, the approaching midterm elections, the impending winter, or “the general din of the world,” as poet Jane Mead once wrote, that evening we questioned, challenged, and argued with one another about a wide range of topics, including politics and literature. Tensions rose, simmered, rose higher still, and cooled. It was a safe environment,…

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reactions

Poets & Writers Magazine welcomes feedback from its readers. Please post a comment on select articles at www.pw.org, e-mail editor@pw.org, or write to Editor, Poets & Writers Magazine, 90 Broad Street, Suite 2100, New York, NY 10004. Letters accepted for publication may be edited for clarity and length. LETTERS Feedback from readers Thank you for “Breaking the Rules: When to Ignore Good Advice” (September/October 2018) by Lenore Myka, who wrote what I, too, have realized since quitting my daily teaching job to become a full-time writer. Friends, family, and former colleagues have tried to go on this transitional journey with me by offering advice and suggestions. Some days I’ve spent more time beating myself up for not putting in a certain number of hours writing than I’ve spent writing. Other days the writing…

access_time5 min.
classic meets graphic

In late 2016 artist Fred Fordham was having coffee with his agent. “Glancing around conspiratorially,” Fordham recalls, “she passed me a notebook in which she had written, ‘How would you like to do some sample pages for a graphic novel of To Kill a Mockingbird?’” A few weeks later, Fordham met with the team at Penguin Random House UK, who asked him to adapt and illustrate Harper Lee’s iconic coming-of-age story. The result, To Kill a Mockingbird: A Graphic Novel, was published in October by Penguin Random House UK and HarperCollins in the United States. Fordham’s agent may have added a conspiratorial flair to her proposal, but creating a graphic adaptation of a classic text is a fairly common occurrence for major publishers these days. In the past several years, HarperCollins…

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contributors

ELENA GOUKASSIAN is an arts writer who lives in Brooklyn, New York. Her most recent work appears in Atlas Obscura, the Calvert Journal, the Art Newspaper, Artsy, and Hyperallergic. GILA LYONS has written about feminism, mental health, and social justice for the New York Times, Salon, Vox, Cosmopolitan, HuffPost, Good, and other publications. Find her on Twitter, @gilalyons, or on her website, gilalyons.com. MEGAN N. LIBERTY is the art books editor at the Brooklyn Rail. Her writing has appeared in the Los Angeles Review of Books, Hyperallergic, Art in Print, and elsewhere. Find her on Twitter, @meganlib. DANA ISOKAWA is the associate editor of Poets & Writers Magazine.…

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page one

Where New And Noteworthy Books Begin “The beginning is always difficult.” A Portrait of the Self as Nation: New and Selected Poems (Norton, October 2018) by Marilyn Chin. Sixth book, fifth poetry collection. Agent: Sandra Dijkstra. Editor: Jill Bialosky. Publicist: Sam Mitchell. “Today when I awoke from a nap the faceless man was there before me.” Killing Commendatore (Knopf, October 2018) by Haruki Murakami. Twenty-second book, fourteenth novel. Agent: Amanda Urban. Editor: Lexy Bloom. Publicist: Gabrielle Brooks. “Do not hang your head or clench your fists / when even your friend, after hearing the story, / says, My mother would never put up with that.” Monument: Poems New and Selected (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, November 2018) by Natasha Trethewey. Sixth book, fifth poetry collection. Agent: Rob McQuilkin. Editor: Jenny Xu. Publicist: Michael Taeckens. “One day…

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