EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
Cars & Motorcycles
Practical Classics

Practical Classics October 2016

Practical Classics magazine has a 30-year tradition of delivering the very best, hands-on classic car experiences to its readers. Every staff writer and contributor works on and restores their own classics. Each issue is packed with: * Rigorous buying advice * Real-world product tests * Inspirational classic driving features * Fascinating historical insight Practical Classics is also a campaigning title, taking the concerns of classic car owners to Parliament and keeping its readers' classics where they belong - on the road. So come and join PC in the workshop - the kettle's on.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
H BAUER PUBLISHING LIMITED
Frequency:
Monthly
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13 Issues

in this issue

2 min.
welcom to the workshop

‘The DS was designed and built by Citroën.’ Matt Tomkins, Project Manager ‘The E-Type was, indeed, very much a Jaguar.’ Sam Skelton, contributor ‘The Beetle was built by Volkswagen.’ Matt George, Prod editor ‘The Mini is a BMC product.’ John Simpson, Workshop guru ‘The SM is a Citroën as well.’ James Walshe, Assistant editor ‘Interceptor? Jensen.’ Danny Hopkins, Editor We at PC seek to be entertaining as well as informative. We try to make sure that you consume what we produce with a smile and a raised eyebrow. All well and good… but underpinning what we serve up, however jocular, is a rigorous adherence to accuracy. We check our facts and make sure we are honest when we get it wrong (‘I think you’ll find’ on our Letters page is the evidence for that). So when a major manufacturer decides to rewrite…

2 min.
beemer’s big bash

This year marks 100 years since Bayerische Motoren Werke AG – now much better-known as BMW – was founded in Germany. And the company, responsible for some of Europe’s finest driving machines, is planning a big party to mark the anniversary. Britain has already held two big shindigs, with BMW forming the Central Feature sculpture at this year’s Goodwood Festival of Speed, followed by last month’s National BMW Festival at Gaydon’s British Motor Museum. However, it’s in the company’s home city of Munich that the major celebration will take place, with the city’s Olympic Park and Stadium being taken over from September 9-11. Daytime events, encompassing the BMW Museum, are free to attend, but the two Stadium Festival Nights are ticket only. They will spectacularly showcase the centenary of BMW over…

1 min.
the month in 5 pictures

The ultra-tough 8500-mile Peking to Paris rally came to an end on July 17, with victory for a 1929 Chrysler 75 Roadster (pre-1941) and a 1973 Datsun 240Z (pre-1975). John Lennon’s 1956 Austin Princess limo came up for auction in Battersea. The car featured in the 1971 film Imagine and was expected to make £250,000. British Car Auctions (BCA) is celebrating its 70th birthday. In the early Nineties, it sold Princess Diana’s Austin Metro for five times its then £1200 value. Over 100,000 visitors attended the Silverstone Classic. More than 1000 competition cars featured, along with 10,000 other historic vehicles on display. The contents of a proposed Cornish motoring museum will be sold by Brightwells on September 21. brightwells.co.uk…

1 min.
starting handle

‘Parts are no good if they leave us stranded’ My trusty Morris Minor Traveller always evokes memories of thousands of happy, reliable miles (with the odd breakdown). But recent experiences have led me to question progress – particularly when it comes to parts. It’s been just two years since my Traveller’s total nut-and-bolt restoration, and already I’ve had to replace three out of the four wheel bearings, the rubber trunnion bushes look tired and the clutch pivot bush has torn through. I’ve also had a weeping wheel cylinder (a pattern replacement), a blown cylinder head gasket and a failed brake pressure switch. And I know I’m not alone. Surely something needs to be done? As consumers we are at least partially to blame. Why would I spend £5 on a condenser when I…

2 min.
stately classics to go to auction

Blackborough House near Cullompton, Devon, has long been famous as the site of Britain’s stateliest scrapyard. The faded grandeur of this unfinished 1830s mansion was perfectly complemented by the decaying Jaguars and Armstrong Siddeleys that surrounded it until recently. Environmental legislation finally doomed the business some years ago and now the Grade II-listed house has been sold. Blackborough’s last custodian-owner, Ralph Sanders, puts a lifetime’s collection of automobilia under the hammer in September. There are rare parts and ephemera garnered from the yard, noted for classics dating from the Twenties onwards. But it’s not just a load of old scrap. Ralph augmented his stocks with many cars – some ready to run and the rest eminently restorable – which he’s kept dry-stored for years. His collection includes a number of Austin Seven saloons…

1 min.
dull but important

FBHVC’S BODY OF EVIDENCE The FBHVC has submitted documents to the DVLA demonstrating that only a car’s chassis – and not its body – is ever considered when identifying it. A Ministry of Transport document states that: ‘The most reasonable assumption is that the chassis constitutes the vehicle and that the chassis consists not only of the frame but also front and rear axles, gears, steering and transmission units. [A] change of body… does not by itself constitute a change of identity.’ WATCH OUT – SCAMMERS ABOUT! Clubs are being warned of companies offering a listing in an International Fairs Directory, following printed listings in the 2015 Classic Motor Show guide. Club Co-ordinator Alison Judge says: ‘On some occasions, these listings are utilised by unofficial companies touting for business or even scammers. Please…