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Queen VictoriaQueen Victoria

Queen Victoria

Queen Victoria

Upon her death on 22 January 1901, Queen Victoria was the longest-reigning monarch in British history. During her six-decade rule, Victoria witnessed a period of great change, from building the biggest empire the world has ever known, to the technological marvels of the Industrial Revolution. But who was the woman beneath the crown? Discover the story of this remarkable queen – meet the man who captured her heart, and learn how the mother of nine balanced royal duty with family life. Find out how Victoria influenced the evolution of British politics, and see how her legacy as the ‘Grandmother of Europe’ lives on to this day...

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Future Publishing Ltd
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BUY ISSUE
R110,77

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time1 min.
welcome to the book of queen victoria

Upon her death on 22 January 1901, Queen Victoria was the longest-reigning monarch in British history. During her six-decade rule, Victoria witnessed a period of great change, from building the biggest empire the world has ever known, to the technological marvels of the Industrial Revolution. But who was the woman beneath the crown? Discover the story of this remarkable queen – meet the man who captured her heart, and learn how the mother of nine balanced royal duty with family life. Find out how Victoria influenced the evolution of British politics, and see how her legacy as the ‘Grandmother of Europe’ lives on to this day……

access_time1 min.
queen victoria

Queen Victoria Editorial Editor Jacqueline Snowden Designer Steve Dacombe Editorial Director Jon White Senior Art Editor Andy Downes All About History Editorial Editor Jonathan Gordon Senior Designer Kym Winters Contributors Jo Cole, Catherine Curzon, Katherine Marsh, Laurie Newman, Jodie Tyley Cover images Alamy, Getty Images, Wikipedia Photography All copyrights and trademarks are recognised and respected Advertising Media packs are available on request Commercial Director Clare Dove clare.dove@futurenet.com International Head of Print Licensing Rachel Shaw licensing@futurenet.com Circulation Head of Newstrade Tim Mathers Production Head of Production Mark Constance Production Project Manager Clare Scott Advertising Production Manager Joanne Crosby Digital Editions Controller Jason Hudson Production Managers Keely Miller, Nola Cokely, Vivienne Calvert, Fran Twentyman Management Chief Content Officer Aaron Asadi Commercial Finance Director Dan Jotcham Head of Art & Design Greg Whitaker Future plc is a public company quoted on the London Stock Exchange (symbol: FUTR) www.futureplc.com Chief executive Zillah Byng-Thorne Non-executive chairman Richard Huntingford Chief financial officer Penny Ladkin-Brand Tel +44 (0)1225 442 244…

access_time2 min.
victoria’s family tree

Monarchs BIRTH – DEATH Length of reign Marriage line George I 1660 – 1727 r. 1714 – 1727 Sophia Dorothea of Celle 1666 – 1726 George II 1683 – 1760 r. 1727 – 1760 Caroline of Ansbach 1683 – 1737 Sophia Dorothea of Hanover 1687 – 1757 Frederick William I of Prussia 1688 – 1740 Augusta of Saxe-Coburg 1719 – 1772 Frederick of Hanover 1707 – 1751 Anne 1709 – 1759 William, Duke of Cumberland 1721 – 1765 Frederick II of Hesse-Cassel 1720 – 1785 Mary 1723 – 1772 Frederick V of Denmark 1723 – 1766 Charles William of Brunswick 1735 – 1806 Augusta 1737 – 1813 Caroline of Brunswick 1768 – 1821 George III 1738 – 1820 r. 1760 – 1820 George IV 1762 – 1830 r. 1820 – 1830 Charlotte of Meklenburg 1744 – 1818 Frederick, Duke of York 1763 – 1827 Edward, Duke of York 1739 – 1767 Adelaide of Saxe-Meiningen 1792 – 1849 William IV 1765 – 1837 r. 1830 – 1837 William Henry, Duke of Gloucester 1743 – 1805 Victoire of Saxe-Coburg 1822 – 1857 Edward, Duke of…

access_time13 min.
the succession crisis

When Victoria was born, the monarchy was in the midst of a mild succession crisis. George III had plenty of children – 15 to be exact – but the untimely death of his heir, George IV’s only child, the beloved Princess Charlotte, had left the future of the monarchy in some disarray. There were three older sons in line before Victoria’s father, Edward, Duke of Kent, but all bar one were aging rapidly and had no legitimate surviving heirs. Upon her birth, Victoria became fifth in line for the throne, and the first in line of the next generation. The prince regent loathed his brother Edward so much that he found the thought of a child of his inheriting the throne utterly detestable. Although he agreed on the surface, standing in…

access_time1 min.
republican stirrings in britain

When Victoria ascended the throne, it wasn’t just her inexperience that served as a barrier to success, but also her own people. Opinion of the monarchy was at an all-time low thanks to her predecessors and unpopular uncles. This dislike of the royals had been a gradual decline going back to George III, who became the scapegoat for the loss of America. His recurring and debilitating mental illnesses did little to restore faith in the Crown, while his son, George IV, made matters worse. Not only were his extra-marital affairs common knowledge, but he was seen to be wasting tax payers’ money on his own frivolities. George lived a life of heavy drinking and indulgence at a time when his countrymen were fighting the Napoleonic Wars. Far from a national hero,…

access_time9 min.
the young princess

When Edward and Victoria, the Duke and Duchess of Kent, left their home in Bavaria and headed to England in the spring of 1819, they had very good reasons for doing so. The duchess was heavily pregnant with what would be the couple’s only child and they were determined that the baby would be born in England, making her unquestionably English in the eyes of the law. The couple arrived in late April and just a month later, on 24 May 1819, Princess Alexandrina Victoria was born in Kensington Palace. The Kents were heavily in debt and their return to London was masterminded and arranged by British army officer John Conroy, an equerry to the duke who was known for his ruthless efficiency. He would play a significant role in the…

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