Star 2021-10-22

Unchallenged as South Africa’s most influential daily newspaper, The Star covers the heart of the nation with unequalled reporting of local, national and international news and sport. It is widely considered to be a superb advertising environment.

Country:
South Africa
Language:
English
Publisher:
Independent Media Pty Ltd
Frequency:
Daily
R 6,99
R 1 099,99
253 Issues

in this issue

2 min
omnia is selling its stake in umongo for r1 billion

Philippa Larkin philippa.larkin@inl.co.za JSE-LISTED diversified chemicals company Omnia Holdings, which said yesterday that it had sold a majority stake in Umongo Petroleum for R1 billion, is now “actively pursuing” acquisitions in mining and agriculture to add to its war chest as well as considering a possible “special dividend” to shareholders or a share buyback at the end of the financial year. Omnia and minority shareholder Autumn Storm Investment had negotiated the deal in a transaction, which will see Orkila South Africa, a subsidiary of Azeli, a global service provider in the speciality chemical and food ingredients industry, secure a 90 percent share in Umongo. Omnia, together with Autumn Storm, would retain a 10 percent shareholding, which was subject to a two-year option agreement. Seelan Gobalsamy, the chief…

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2 min
transnet’s ongoing rail and port problems knocks kumba’s outlook

Dineo Faku dineo.faku@inl.co.za KUMBA Iron Ore was the latest company yesterday to flag concerns about Transnet’s rail and port challenges, which knocked its production guidance lower. Petrochemicals company Sasol also said yesterday it was facing logistical challenges in transporting export coal due to Transnet Freight and Rail. Chrome and platinum group metals producer, Tharisa Minerals, said last week the South African inland logistics issues had led to longer supply chains and thus increased pricing for products. Yesterday, Kumba said it expected full year production and sales to be at the lower end of its guidance due to Transnet’s rail and port logistics performing below planned levels. Kumba, a unit of Anglo American, said it would limit production in the months ahead and to finish the year at the low…

2 min
strike ends with 6% wage hike

Banele Ginindza banele.ginindza@inl.co.za THE PROLONGED metals and engneering sector strike, which has cost the economy more than R600 million, has ended after the National Union of Metalworkers of South Africa (Numsa) yesterday announced it would accept a 6.6 percent incremental wage hike over three years from employer organisation the Steel and Engineering Industries Federation of Southern Africa (Seifsa) General secretary Irvin Jim of Numsa, South Africa’s biggest metalworkers union, said employers, the National Employers Association of South Africa (Neasa) and the Consoli- dated Employers Organisation had to quickly accede to the new wages that would give workers R52.52 per hour in the first year, R55.67 in the second year and R59.01 in year three. Seifsa chief executive Lucio Trentini said the industry had lost more than R600m…

2 min
‘ozark’ promises super-sized problems, bangs

Shingai Darangwa shingai.darangwa@inl.co.za When I first got my hands on Ozark last year, at the heart of the Covid-19 lockdown, I ploughed through all three brilliant seasons within a week. The American crime drama streaming television series stars Jason Bateman and Laura Linney as married couple Marty and Wendy Byrde. The couple and their two children relocate to the Lake of the Ozarks to set up a money-laundering operation after their shady dealings with a Mexican cartel is brought to light. Created by Bill Dubuque and Mark Williams, the series has received 32 Primetime Emmy Award nominations and become one of Netflix’s most popular shows, sparking comparisons to the classic series Breaking Bad. After season three, Bateman expressed excitement at the upcoming season: “A super-sized season means super-sized problems for…

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4 min
what part does desirability politics play?

WHEN it comes to becoming a viral sensation in South Africa, 15 minutes of fame can quickly turn into a real career or elevate your career if played right. Unlike in other countries, a viral moment can go from being an internet sensation to making TV appearances, being interviewed by major news outlets, and getting bookings for events. We’ve seen it happen multiple times from the John Vuli Gate girls to Mzansi bullying DJ Maphorisa to making Phoyisa with Qwesta Kufet – after a video of him rapping over a different amapiano beat went viral. Most recently, Uncle Waffles, real name Lungelihle Zwane, grabbed the attention of the nation during one of her DJing sets, and even gained international attention, along with a follow on Instagram from the Champagne Papi…

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7 min
analysis: sa’s beekeeping is up 400%, but is it poised to fail?

From the outside – with demand for honey and commercial pollination services reaching “colossal” levels, and four times the number of registered beekeepers this year than in 2016 – it appears that South Africa’s beekeeping industry is on the up and up. But experts on the inside tell a different story: one of a fragmented, confused industry with resource scarcities across the board. Disorganisation, government mismanagement, insufficient training and sweeping initiatives to wipe out bee forage countrywide are setting the burgeoning industry up to fail. Without a full systems overhaul, these experts say the industry’s future is in peril. Here’s why. Beekeeper numbers give a false impression? The number of registered beekeepers countrywide has increased approximately 400 percent in the past five years alone, according to data from the…

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