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VerandaVeranda

Veranda Sep/Oct 2018

VERANDA is a forum for the very best in living well. Always gracious, and never pretentious, we keep readers abreast of the finest in design, decorating, luxury travel, and more, inspiring them with beauty and elegance. VERANDA is both an ideas showcase and a deeply pleasurable escape, a place where homes feel as good as they look.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Hearst
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6 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time1 min.
far and away

It’s our first-ever Wanderlust Issue, and we’re bringing the world home to you with insight from stylish jet-setters (think of them as your personal concierges) and with inspiring houses in France, Israel, the Bahamas, and beyond—even a trio of Stateside properties that are totally transporting. So please sit back, relax, and enjoy the ride.…

access_time1 min.
the view from veranda

it’s our first Wanderlust issue, devoted to the wonders of travel and the enriching effect it has on our lives (and our homes!). I’ve always been a big fan of getting out of my comfort zone, and I have been lucky enough to visit inspiring destinations around the world: Jordan, New Zealand, Israel, Thailand, Indonesia, and China are some of the places outside of Europe where my passport has been stamped. Yet I’m embarrassed to say that there are parts of New York City, our magazine’s home base, that are uncharted territory for me, although I do my best to seek out little-known pockets off my regular route between Manhattan and my house north of town. I hope to remedy that even more in the coming year. Then again, I am quite…

access_time2 min.
heiress apparent

hearing Marie-Louise Sciò describe her childhood summers at Il Pellicano, the storied Tuscan resort owned by her father, Roberto Sciò, one can’t help but picture an Italian version of Eloise running loose among the glitterati of the 1970s and ’80s. “I got into so much trouble as a kid,” Sciò recalls. “Children still aren’t allowed there to this day!” Juvenile shenanigans aside, that picture perfect setting—the resort’s de facto house photographer was none other than Slim Aarons—provided ideal training for Sciò’s current roles as creative director for the Pellicano Group (which also includes 17th-century villa–turned-hotel La Posta Vecchia) and owner of her consultancy. While Sciò has put her own mark on Il Pellicano—updating everything from its decor (Fornasetti wallpaper, Gio Ponti chairs) to staff uniforms (inspired by Yves Saint Laurent) to the…

access_time1 min.
jet set

access_time6 min.
stars in her eyes

looking back at my childhood, two things amaze me. The first is the discovery of how many of the things I liked, indeed loved, at the age of five remain personal favorites to this day. Consistent I have been: roses, peonies, polka dots, stripes, and red, white, and blue all remain a huge part of my design vocabulary. The other is that, even as a little girl, I associated fashion with fantasy and dreams, with the idea of having the right outfit to suit a role. Over the years, I’ve heard many designers speak about the origins of their interest in fashion. Frequently, a magazine is involved: “As a child, I pored over every issue of Vogue and thought, Someday…” That is as far from my experience as you can imagine.…

access_time3 min.
the craftsman

he’s been called the most influential British architect since Christopher Wren, a polymath whose enduring legacy of English houses continues to beguile with idiosyncratic charm and impeccable craftsmanship. And now, with the inauguration of the Lutyens Trust America, dedicated to the celebration of his contributions to the field, Edwin Lutyens is getting another turn in the spotlight, and the attention couldn’t be more apt. Lutyens was born in London in 1869 and spent his childhood in Surrey. He had no formal education but was something of a prodigy: Based on the strength of his drawing skills, he enrolled at what would become the Royal College of Art at 16, left at 18 to apprentice at a prestigious London architecture firm, and, by the time he was 20, had opened his own…

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