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Women's Health UKWomen's Health UK

Women's Health UK

June 2019

Women’s Health is the first UK magazine to bring you health, beauty, fitness, fashion, weight loss, food & sex, all wrapped up in one super-glossy lifestyle title

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Hearst Magazines UK
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11 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

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welcome to women’s health

Do you love your body? There’s a loaded question for you. How many of us are truly content with what we see in the mirror? Sadly, too few. British women have the second lowest body confidence in the world, according to last year’s Women’s Health global Naked survey – behind Poland, if you were wondering – and only 9%* of us would describe our body confidence as high.It’s a miserable state of affairs. And I can be one of these dissatisfied women. My relationship with my body is challenging at best, and dire at worst. There are days when what I see in the mirror makes me cry. My negative mindset is a lifelong affliction, the seeds of which were sown when I was just a child. And as the…

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ditch cutlery to enjoy your food

Quirky. If the word makes you cringe (see also: ‘bubbly’ and ‘random’), bear with us as we tell you how it could inform your healthy dining choices. Researchers at Ohio State University explored the influence of quirky ways of eating on participants’ enjoyment of food. Methods included eating popcorn with chopsticks (we’re into it) and lapping up water like a cat (less into it). They concluded that the sheer novelty of taking a different approach – as opposed to the approach itself – was enough to enhance enjoyment, with participants reporting that they found themselves paying more attention to the task at hand and felt more immersed in the eating experience. While some quirky approaches are best left in the lab – unless you’re in pursuit of your P45, probably…

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news you can use

The Italian jogAdopting a Mediterranean diet could help you run faster, and it’s got nothing to do with carb-loading on pasta. A paper published in the Journal Of The American College Of Nutrition found that eating like the Italians can knock 6% off your 5k time in just four days. Athletes running on treadmills in the small study performed better after switching from a Western diet (low on vegetables and high in saturated fat) to a Mediterranean diet (rich in whole grains, veg and olive oil), although it made no significant impact on anaerobic exercise tests.YOU DO YOUThose who express non-visible ‘stigmatised identities’ (such as mental health issues or sexual orientation) in the workplace are thought to be happier and more productive. New research* found that those who feel able…

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do natural deodorants actually work?

A pedant’s commentary on the finer points of perspiration: sweat doesn’t actually smell. Deodorants prevent the odour that sweat produces when it mingles with bacteria on your skin; antiperspirants prevent the sweating itself. ‘The active ingredients in antiperspirants are aluminium salts,’ says consultant dermatologist Dr Natalia Spierings. ‘These “block” sweat glands, thereby stopping perspiration reaching the skin’s surface.’ It’s these that cause some people’s carcinogen concerns (the jury’s out, by the way, no studies have found a causal link between aluminium salts and cancer), making them opt for natural aluminium-free formulas. ‘Natural deodorants contain antibacterial compounds – such as baking powder or tea tree oil – which have odour-reducing effects,’ says Dr Spierings. So, natural deodorants: BO-busting, yes; sweat-stopping, no. There are now, however, aluminium-free antiperspirants, which contain ingredients such…

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asking for a friend

I CAN’T POO AT MY PARTNER’S HOUSE, BUT IT HURTS TO HOLD IT IN. HOW CAN I DO IT WITHOUT KILLING THE ROMANCE?While not the most obvious source of wisdom on the subject, Sir Michael Caine was on to something. When quizzed on the secret to lasting love, he famously replied: two bathrooms. Should you, having spent all your cash on avocado toast, not be able to afford a place with even one bathroom (#millennialproblems), however, then you might need a plan B. Because giving yourself stomach pain so your beloved can keep up their illusion that you’re a she-bot free from the messy business of being a human is, quite frankly, a crock of shit. By all means, grab a mag, march towards the bathroom and say, ‘Darling, I’m…

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my office is freezing. is it bad for my health?

Unless you’re in freezer sales and take a hardcore approach to demonstrating the effectiveness of your products, your office probably isn’t freezing. Workplace regulations suggest that temperatures shouldn’t fall below 16°C, making the likelihood of losing toes pretty slim. When you’re cold, your brain reaches out to the limbic and nervous systems. The former tells you to curl up and conserve your heat around the vital organs; the latter relays the news that you’re chilly to your blood vessels, which constrict to retain heat, and your muscles, which kick-start the shivering process. But your body has another mechanism for generating heat. ‘Cold exposure, diet and exercise all activate brown fat,’ says Professor Michael Symonds, medical researcher at the University of Nottingham. And this isn’t the kind that clogs your arteries.…

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